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  1. Pink wool bodice and skirt
    1883 - 1886

    National Museum of Australia

    This fine wool dress dates from about 1885 and belonged to one of the daughters of pastoralist, William Pitt Faithfull, founder of the pioneering merino stud, Springfield. The tight fitting, boned bodice and bustled skirt decorated with lace flounces and frills are of the style fashionable among the middle and upper classes in Britain and Europe during this period. In a maturing colony female free settlers and their Australian-born daughters used fashion to maintain and reinforce their social status within ... more

  2. Port Arthur Convict Issue Parti-Coloured Waistcoat
    1855 - 1877

    Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery

    This waistcoat was issued to a convict transported from Britain to Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania). It was part of the issued uniform given to Port Arthur convicts during the operation of the penal system 1830 - 1877. Seven classes of prisoner were created in 1826 during Governor Arthur's period of office. Clothing for convicts were mostly blue or grey. The lowest convict class wore yellow, the colour then associated with humiliation. Port Arthur was reserved for repeat-offending criminals ... more

  3. Port Arthur Convict Issue Parti-Coloured Waistcoat
    1855 - 1877

    Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery

    This waistcoat was issued to a convict transported from Britain to Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania). It was part of the issued uniform given to Port Arthur convicts during the operation of the penal system 1830 - 1877. Seven classes of prisoner were created in 1826 during Governor Arthur's period of office. Clothing for convicts were mostly blue or grey. The lowest convict class wore yellow, the colour then associated with humiliation. Port Arthur was reserved for repeat-offending criminals, with ... more

  4. Port Arthur Convict Parti-Coloured Uniform Trousers
    1830 - 1877

    Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery

    These trousers were issued to a convict transported from Britain to Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania). They were part of the issued uniform given to the Port Arthur convicts during the operation of the penal system on the Tasman Peninsula 1830 - 1877. Seven classes of prisoner were created in 1826 during Governor Arthur's period of office. Clothing for convicts was mostly blue or grey, the lowest convict class were compelled to wear yellow, the colour then associated with humiliation. Port ... more

  5. Port Macquarie Hockey Club blazer worn by Peggy Haynes
    1953

    Port Macquarie Historical Society

    This single breasted woollen women’s hockey blazer was worn by Margaret Coral Haynes, known as Peggy [  - 1995] and often spelt as Haines. The blazer recognises Peggy’s participation in five NSW Country Week Competitions representing Port Macquarie over the years 1947 to 1949, 1951 and 1953. Peggy Haynes appears to have been an exceptional hockey player, participating in the sport at many levels, as a player and coach. The sport of hockey was formally established in NSW in the early ... more

  6. Porter Family wedding gown
    1855 - 1883

    Quirindi and District Historical Society

    The dress is made of Silk Taffeta in a plum blue colour that changes when the light hits the material or as you move around the room. The dress was the "best" dress of the owner and not necessarily a wedding dress. The dress was worn for a second time by the daughter of the original owner and would have sentimental value for her because her Mother had previously passed away. A parasol was made for the wedding of the ... more

  7. Possum skin cloak
    1839 - 1840

    Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

    This cloak is extremely significant, as it is an extremely rare historical example of an element of the clothing of Indigenous people in South Eastern Australia that has continued importance today. There are many reasons why the majority of skin cloaks did not survive to the present day. One of these reasons was because when a person died all their belongings were disposed of, also some people were wrapped in their skin cloaks after their death. During the early colonial ... more

  8. Prince Charming costume worn by Frederick Boyton Smith
    1928 - 1934

    Museum of the Riverina

    The Prince Charming costume worn by Frederick Boyton Smith is of Historic significance, being a good example of a Depression era children's costume. Surviving from a time when children's parents handmade costumes from oddments found around the home - for example, cardboard, crepe paper, cotton wool and scraps of fabric, it is rare to find children's costumes in this worn condition with all pieces intact, in this case, the hat, jacket, breeches, tights and shoes. The accompanying photograph ... more

  9. Printed linen housecoat
    1940 - 1945

    Buda Historic Home and Garden

    This housecoat leads us into the remarkable story of the Leviny family of Castlemaine. Ernest Leviny (1818-1905) was an Hungarian silversmith and jeweller of some repute who in 1853 travelled to the Victorian goldfields and became one of the wealthiest residents in town. In 1864 he married Englishwoman, Bertha Hudson, and they moved into 'Buda', now a historic house museum.  The Leviny's had 10 children, 4 boys and 6 girls. Five of their daughters lived at Buda House for ... more

  10. Privy Councillor's uniform of Joseph Cook, Prime Minister
    1914

    Parramatta Heritage Centre

    This uniform and insignia are historically significant because they are a wonderful example of quite a rare and important costume in early Australian culture. The insignia is especially rare, as the number presented every year are limited and recipients after 1948 have to return the insignia to the British Crown upon their deaths. The fact that the uniform belongs to Joseph Cook also makes it significant. Cook was voted in as the MP for Hartley in the New South Wales ... more

  11. Protective clothing worn on Mawson's Australasian Antarctic Expedition, 1911-1913, by Charles Francis Laseron
    1911 - 1913

    Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences

    These items of protective clothing were worn by Charles Francis Laseron who worked as a taxidermist, biological collector and Mawson's general scientific assistant on Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) between 1912 and 1913. They are part of a collection of protective clothing worn by Laseron on the AA expedition and are indicative of some of the equipment necessary to survive and work in the harsh conditions of Antarctica. Along with related items in the collection, they signify Australia's immense contribution ... more

  12. Protective clothing worn on Mawson's Australasian Antarctic Expedition, 1911-1913, by Morton Henry Moyes
    1911 - 1913

    Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences

    These protective accessories were worn by Morton Henry Moyes who worked as a meteorologist on the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) between 1911 and 1913. They are part of a collection of protective clothing worn by Moyes on the AAEand are indicative of some of the equipment necessary to survive and work in the harsh conditions of Antarctica. Along with related items in the collection, they signify Australia's immense contribution to exploration and scientific research in the Antarctic region and provide insight ... more