Filtered results for:Outerwear

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  1. Full length Top Coat
    1942 - 1943

    Private collectors

    This coat and hat were worn by Nydia Ede, campaigner, volunteer and local politician in Broken Hill. Nydia formed the Women’s Auxiliary Branch of the ALP in Broken Hill and served as its Secretary, Treasurer and President, in which capacity she campaigned for women’s rights, particularly the issue of equal pay for equal work. Her political efforts culminated in her election to the Broken Hill City Council in 1962. In the tightly union controlled mining industry this was an important ... more

  2. Tartan cutaway jacket
    1750 - 1850

    Maclean District Historical Society

    Norman McSween, the Scottish owner of the coat, came as a widower with his family from the Isle of Skye on the “Ontario” in 1852. The Ship’s indent says that they were “a very poor and destitute family”, so perhaps the coat was their one treasure and a reminder of their native land. Norman died aged 46, on the voyage to Australia, so the significance of the coat would have increased, especially to his 6 children aged from 10 to ... more

  3. Mans Brown Leather Trench Coat
    1915 - 1925

    National Institute of Dramatic Art

    This classic leather trench coat is typical of those worn by men in the early 20th Century. Trench coats were developed in the first word war to be worn by allied soldiers as a windbreaker and raincoat. They were made of leather or the newly invented cotton gabardine, a tough, tightly woven, water resistant fabric. After the war many veterans kept their trench coats and the style became fashionable with the wider community. This example has the classic features of ... more

  4. Woman's dust coat dress
    1880 - 1890

    Gulgong Pioneers Museum

    This is an important example of occupational or travel dress. Unostenatious garments, such as this one, can be overlooked in collections, but this garment is quite rare. Sometimes called a 'duster' they are quite common in American mail order catalogues. They were worn over smart clothes to protect from dust or weather. The fastening right down the front, to the absolute bottom of the hem, suggests the wearer intended to eliminate any speck of dust collecting on her more expensive ... more

  5. Riding Habit - Edith Lavinia Cameron
    1890 - 1899

    Canberra Museum and Gallery

    Riding habit belonging to Edith Lavinia Cameron (nee. Kilby). This ensemble is historically signficant because of its well-documented connection both to the Kilby and Cameron families who were some of the earliest settlers in the Limestone Plains region, later to be incorporated into the Australian Capital Territory.  Despite Edith Cameron owning a riding habit, this is not indicative of superior wealth or status. The Kilbys and Camerons were both of modest means, Robert being a blacksmith before he became a ... more

  6. Len Forsythe Boat Cloak
    1900

    Rocky Hill War Memorial Museum

    This British Royal Navy Officer's boat cloak dates from c.1900-1939. It is made from fine, worsted, British wool, is hip length and has seams at the sides. We know that the garment was not Australian, as the word 'AUSTRALIA' would be printed on the lower edge of the buttons if that were the case. Boat cloaks were an optional item of dress for navy personnel, worn mainly over full dress, ball dress or mess dress for additional warmth when travelling in an open ship's boat/gig/barge, either between ... more

  7. Mina Wylie's Olympic Blazer
    1912

    Randwick District and Historical Society

    Blazer worn by Wilhemina (Mina) Wylie, as a member of the Australiasia Team to the 1912 Olympic Games in Stockholm. This was the first Olympics where women were permitted to compete in swimming events, and Wylie herself won the Silver Medal in the 100m Freestyle (Fanny Durack won Gold). Given the blazer's association with both a prominent Australian sportswoman and a significant milestone in Olympic history, this garment can be confidently considered as historically signficant. The blazer also illustrated the ... more

  8. Wylie's Baths Swimming Costume
    1900 - 1910

    Randwick District and Historical Society

    Standard issue, one-size-fits-all bathing suit hired out to patrons of Wylie's Baths; a garment which demonstrates considerable historical signficance because of its unusual design. In an era when the construction and style of bathing suits was strongly distinguished between men and women, this garment appears to be unisex, with the only part which adjusts according to the shape of the wearer is the drawstring around the neck. The garment nevertheless reflects contemporary concerns with maintaining modesty over mobility whilst bathing; ... more

  9. Protective clothing worn on Mawson's Australasian Antarctic Expedition, 1911-1913, by Morton Henry Moyes
    1911 - 1913

    Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences

    These protective accessories were worn by Morton Henry Moyes who worked as a meteorologist on the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) between 1911 and 1913. They are part of a collection of protective clothing worn by Moyes on the AAEand are indicative of some of the equipment necessary to survive and work in the harsh conditions of Antarctica. Along with related items in the collection, they signify Australia's immense contribution to exploration and scientific research in the Antarctic region and provide insight into ... more

  10. Protective clothing worn on Mawson's Australasian Antarctic Expedition, 1911-1913, by Charles Francis Laseron
    1911 - 1913

    Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences

    These items of protective clothing were worn by Charles Francis Laseron who worked as a taxidermist, biological collector and Mawson's general scientific assistant on Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) between 1912 and 1913. They are part of a collection of protective clothing worn by Laseron on the AA expedition and are indicative of some of the equipment necessary to survive and work in the harsh conditions of Antarctica. Along with related items in the collection, they signify Australia's immense contribution to exploration ... more